Mundus Alter Et Item

Mundus Alter Et Item

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1908 Excerpt: ... word in the ordinary English sense, 'master of the ceremonies.' 7. en tibi ut non languido...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1908 Excerpt: … word in the ordinary English sense, ‘master of the ceremonies.’ 7. en tibi ut non languido cursu, &c, ‘see with what an abundant stream Bacchus’s water-clock still flows.’ 20. bene vos, bene nos, &c.: supply e. g. amet for tuna. 25. splenem movit, ‘moved my spleen,’ i. e. annoyed me. 26. musis omnibus invitis: lit. ‘all the muses being unwilling’. People in such a state are scarcely fit to sing. 32. Laberius: a Roman poet contemporary with Julius Caesar. He was famous as a writer of ‘mimes’, i. e. mimic farcical plays or comedies. Page 28, 1. 1. inabsentem: with reference to (some one) absent. 2. Anacreonticis: Anacreontic in character. Anacreon is well known as the poet of love and wine. 6. in risus immodicos solutum: lit. ‘relaxed in immoderate laughter’. solutus suggests absence of self-control, intoxication. 14. quid quis, oui propinaverit, ‘ what each has drunk, (and) to whose health he has drunk it.’ 15. (dum)modo quis auscultando fuerit, ‘provided any one is fit to listen.’ 29. hoc noctis, ‘at this time of night’; cf. id aetatis, at that age, a very peculiar accusative, possibly of duration. Page 29,1. 23. laesae societatis, ‘ offence against the company.’ A phrase formed on analogy of laesa maiestas, ‘high treason’ (lit. the dignity (of the Roman people) injured). In a section here omitted we are told:–‘ Pictores longe optimi sunt, dum (inasmuch as) tremulam facit manum ebriosa senectus’. Further, ‘ Poetas habent plurimos, sordidum genus hominum ipsaeque faeces imae plebeculae. Unicum illis ferunt aetatem hanc tulisse vere poetam, quem propter intempestivum veriloquium (truthful speaking) fame audivi periisse.’ H Page 30,1.19. glebas turis. This phrase is from Lucretius’ poem de Rerum Natura, iii. 328. 25. Won patuere fores, &c. Hall i…

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Publisher: RareBooksClub.com
Publication Year: 2012
ISBN: 1130370801
List Price: $19.99
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